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The Department of Sociology examines patterns and dynamics of social relations, while paying special attention to issues of social justice…

 

Please check the University of Hawai‘i Summer Sessions Course Availability page for course details and changes or contact the socdept@hawaii.edu for more information.

The Department of Sociology covers many major dimensions of sociology and over time has developed academic expertise and excellence in the following domains: race, ethnicity, gender, class; health, aging, medical sociology; Asia, Pacific and Hawaiʻi in regional and global contexts; crime, law, and social control; and nationalism, globalization, and sustainability.

Summer 2 • July 6 – August 13, 2021

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology (ONLINE)
Alexandra Kisitukisitu@hawaii.edu
Sociology can be understood as the study of human groups or society, and it is also a perspective about how society is shaped. The goal of this course is to allow students to learn sociological concepts and use them to think critically, utilize the sociological imagination, and make sense of the world and our place in it. This online course gives students the opportunity to reflect on their own lives, understand sociological issues in Hawaiʻi, and to understand social structures that impact people at the grassroots level. (3 credits) DS

SOC 305 Women and Health (ONLINE)
Zero Texbook Cost course
Alexandra Kisitukisitu@hawaii.edu
This course looks at women’s health, gender-based medicalization, and health inequalities using a sociological and feminist lens. Weʻll focus on a variety of topics pertaining to womenʻs health, from embodiment to physician-patient relations. The highlight of this course is an assignment where students have the opportunity to creatively express a topic within women’s health. (3 credits) DS

SOC 413 Economy and Society (ONLINE)
Manfred Stegermanfred@hawaii.edu
This course examines the relationship between capitalism and modern societies from the industrial revolution to our current age of globalization. After exploring the historical development of capitalism, we’ll discuss major social impacts of global capitalism on the world’s climate, financial infrastructure, inequality, job insecurity, automation, and surveillance. The course will end with a consideration of possible future trajectories of global capitalism, especially in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. No previous background in economics is required, and this course does not utilize any mathematical or quantitative methods. It offers an accessible sociological approach that will help you understand the power of capitalism in the world and provide you with the tools to critically assess its strengths and weaknesses. (3 credits) DS

Varied Dates

SOC 231 Intro to Juvenile Delinquency (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Nick Chagnonchagnon@hawaii.edu
This course focuses on deviance and criminal offending by youths, and the ensuing social reactions. The class takes a critical perspective to examine what causes crime and what forces shape our responses to it. We will pay particular attention to how current events are relevant to class material. This course takes an experiential learning approach, using research activities to teach course material. (3 credits)

SOC 251 Introduction to Sociology of the Family (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Lin Liulinliu@hawaii.edu
Explore the social aspects of marriage and family. Examine the changes of the dating and marriage patterns. Discuss issues of contemporary concerns: interracial dating, same sex marriage, etc. Learn how cultural factors shape family structures. Discover love, dating, cohabitation, marriage and parenthood. (3 credits) DS, HAP, WI

SOC 300 Principles of Sociological Inquiry (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Quincy Edwardsqedwards@hawaii.edu
This is a four-credit asynchronous online course that sets a foundation for empirical research in the social sciences. It imparts the requisite skills for advancement to successful 400-level coursework. Students participate in weekly online discussions, quick quizzes, and practica, and develop a research project. (4 credits) DS, ETH, WI

SOC 311 Sociology of Social Stratification and Inequality (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13
Omar Birdbirdo@hawaii.edu
In this course, students will learn to identify terminology and current events that are directly tied to sociological insights on social stratification and social inequality. Students will develop a firm academic understanding of core concepts, and be able to apply course content to their everyday lives as individuals and the larger society. Most of the assignments and course content will be up-to-date using a variety of multimedia tools to ensure a diversified class. For one assignment, students will upload a video regarding social inequality and provide their immediate reaction. They will read and learn more about the topic, and then revisit their initial responses to see if their perspectives have changed. All students in the course will be able to see how other students interpret the world around them. (3 credits) DS

SOC 318 Women and Social Policy (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Hannah Liebreichhannahli@hawaii.edu
In this class, we will learn about social policies and how they impact women. The focus will be on social institutions such as education, the economy, and social services, to name a few. Topics will be examined on the local, national, and international level. This class is notable because not only will we cover women and social policy broadly, we will also hone in on specific local issues. (3 credits) DS

SOC 321 Sociological Theory (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13
Nick Chagnonchagnon@hawaii.edu
This class will provide undergraduate students with an introduction to sociological theory. We will cover classical and contemporary theories. The course will introduce and explain select theoretical traditions and orientations, paying close attention to their historical origins.
With a flexible-student centered approach, we will explore a range of theories that are influential across the disciplines of the social sciences, and apply them to real-world issues and events. This course is a requirement for the sociology major. (3 credits) DS, ETH, WI

SOC 333 Survey of Criminology (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Hannah Liebreichhannahli@hawaii.edu
In this class, we will learn about ethical considerations of criminology. This shall include exploring theory as well as applied work related broadly to the field of criminology. Some of these theories and topics include critical criminology and intersectionality. Students will learn from each other in an asynchronous environment. For example, students must complete an interactive, discussion leader project. (3 credits) DS, ETH

SOC 335 Drugs and Society (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Gordon Knowlesknowlesg@hawaii.edu
This course will provide an overview of drug use in modern society in relation to addiction, substance abuse, violent crime, and narco-terrorism. This course will also examine the sociological, biological, and psychological theories of drug use, abuse, and addiction. Drug reduction and drug prevention strategies of police intervention techniques, search and seizure, drug treatment programs, and drug resistance skills training will be presented. Nearly 20.6 million people in the United States over the age of 12 suffer with an addiction to alcohol or drugs. On average, 100 people die every day from a drug overdose, and the rate has tripled in the past 20 years. Yearly, tobacco causes more deaths than all other substance abuse-related deaths combined. (3 credits) DS, WI

SOC 336 Deviance and Social Control (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Noreen KohlNoreenK@hawaii.edu
Deviance is everywhere—it is behaviors or acts that violate social norms—and it shapes our social world. In this course, you will learn how and why human behaviors, from sexuality to mental illness to social activism, are socially constructed as “deviant.” We will investigate social control mechanisms in institutions such as medicine and the criminal legal system, using current events and contemporary issues to understand sociological perspectives on deviance and social control. As a class, we will discuss and debate the medicalization and criminalization of different deviant behaviors. We will explore issues of crime, substance use, the school-to-prison pipeline, poverty, mental illness, women’s reproductive health, and social movements. (3 credits) DS

SOC 353 Survey of Sociology of Aging (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13
Krista Hodgeskhodges@hawaii.edu or 808-223-9393
Look at aging through a social lens. Topics will include how the growing elderly population and their social patters are impacting our society. We will look at and learn various theoretical perspectives through discussions, reading and writing. This course is an opportunity for students to learn the broad aspects and impacts of aging and also focus in on a topic they are interested in. The course will be delivered online, but requires check-ins with the instructor via phone, text or Zoom. (3 credits) DS

SOC 354 Survey of Medical Sociology (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13
Zero Textbook Cost course

Lin Liulinliu@hawaii.edu
This course provides an overview of the sociology of health, illness, and health care. The course aims to help you to critically examine health and illness from a sociological perspective by understating the role of social factors in determining the health of individuals, groups, and the larger society. Studying Medical Sociology is a stepping-stone towards greater career opportunities in the medical field. (3 credits) DS, HAP, WI

SOC 358 Sociology of Korea (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Keith Scottkeithgs@hawaii.edu
From K-pop to Kim Jong-un, this course covers a wide range of social issues faced by contemporary Korea. Beginning with a brief overview of the rapid and massive social changes that have taken place across the 20th century, the course then covers the following topics: class inequality, family structure, gender inequality, education, North Korean society, immigration and rising multiculturalism in Korea, politics and social movements, LGBTQ rights, and more. All readings are provided online, so students are not required to purchase a textbook. (3 credits)

SOC 432 Punishment and Society (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Zero Textbook Cost course
Ashley Rubinatrubin@hawaii.edu
What caused mass incarceration, and what have been the consequences? What’s going on with prisons in these days of COVID-19? In this class, students learn about prisons and the criminal justice system in the United States and here in Hawaiʻi, and also how to find further information so that learning continues after the course is over. (3 credits) DS

SOC 475: Analysis in Survey Research (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13
Quincy Edwards • qedwards@hawaii.edu
This asynchronous online course is designed as an introduction to sociological research methods focusing on survey research and contemporary ethical issues. Students discover how public opinion is measured, and learn to design and administer a survey. A statistics background is not necessary to take this course. Students participate in weekly online discussions, oral communication activities, attain human subjects and information security certifications, and complete a survey research project. (3 credits) DS, ETH, OC

SOC 495 Topics in Sociology: The American Prison (ONLINE)
June 7 – August 13

Zero Textbook Cost course
Ashley Rubinatrubin@hawaii.edu
How did sending people to prisons become a thing? What’s the difference between a penitentiary and a big house or between jail and prison? What’s so new about the prisons we have today? This class covers the history of the prison in the United States, but also in other parts of the world. Students learn unexpected discoveries about how we’ve punished in the past and why we punish the way we do today. (3 credits)


Updated 04/106/21